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1955 155W Brockway - Continental to Cummins

Posted By oldspwr 6 Years Ago
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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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I have been posting regular updates over on the Brockway message board but I figured I would share them here as well.  My Dad and I finished restoring this 1955 155W Brockway in 2008 and been enjoying it ever since... It has been to Cortland and Macungie numerous times and even made the trip up to West Springfield Mass for the show...   Even with having the 361 and 761, I really enjoy driving this truck. So I decided it was time to make a few changes...


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The 42BD or 427 flathead Continental has been a great motor but really doesn’t have the power you need for today’s roads. It will run 55mph all day long on level road but once you hit any kind of grade your down to 40 in the right hand lane with the 4 ways on. I would like to be able to run 60 mph up a hill so I decided it would be a good time to upgrade the Continental. I did consider making some upgrades to the 427, like adding dual carbs with the Ellis manifold, maybe an MSD ignition, a Mallory distributor, etc., but most of these upgrades would have little gains verses the costs. It’s also start to leak some oil so that was another deciding factor...

So after much thought I decided to replace the Continental with a 5.9 Cummins. They are comparable in size as well as weight. I did consider the 8.3 Cummins but that weighs in at 1800lbs which is about a 1000lbs heavier than the Continental. You can also build decent power fairly economically with these motors. I also knew that these were used in some smaller Freightliners with air brakes so that was a plus since (air compressor, etc...)

More to follow...




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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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One of the first things I need to do was change the gears in the truck Almost since I bought the truck, my Dad and I had always talked about finding a taller set of gears to see if it would help the truck move along a little better. Right now the truck has 6.71/9.13’s and based on several 155W specs sheets I have collected, 5.43/7.39’s and 6.14/8.36’s were also available. So I put a quick spreadsheet together a numbers of years ago to compare the ratios and 5.43’s would lower my RPM’s from about 2150 to 1800 at 55 mph. 



When I started looking for gears a while back, I hit a number of roadblocks since I didn’t have enough information. To make matters worse, the specs list the rears as both 20501 and 20503 and I was not able to find these numbers anywhere in any of Eaton’s older literature. A few guys asked for the casting number (28656) and I was able to find a set in Toledo OH but they wanted $1500... ouch... Then about 3 years ago I found a rear out of a 257 that came with a 180 Cummins. The casting number matched my rear (28656) so I bought the rear and set if off to the side. On a side note, I do have a spec sheet for the H257T and it only list the only available rear ratio as 5.43/7.39 but they call the rear an R454.

When I decided on the Cummins upgrade a few months ago, I figured I would change the gears first just to see how they worked with the Continental. If I remember correctly, I talked to the owner of the Green Apple Express 257 a few years ago and he said he replaced his gears with 5.43’s and it made a world of difference driving the truck with the 572 Continental. So I decided to pull the pumpkin from the rear and get it ready to install in the truck. But that was easier said than done... I had the rear sitting on a drop deck trailer on the far side of yard and at the time I wasn’t able to bring the trailer over to the garage to lift the pumpkin out with the fork lift.



So we wound up using the cherry picker and my 4 wheeler along with a utility cart, in the rain I might add, to get the pumpkin in the garage...

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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Then using some 2x6’s and some extra heavy duty casters I had, I made a quick ‘box’ to be able to move the pumpkin around.  Besides, I would need something to move or store the 6.71’s when I removed them...





Then with some ‘help’ from Maddie I was able to roll the pumpkin outside...



And get everything cleaned up...



More to follow...



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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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After everything was cleaned up, I realized the ratio was actually stamped on the carrier. Before I thought the only way to identify the ration was by looking at the head if the pinion when the number of ring and pinion teeth were stamped. Here is a quick sketch of where the numbers are on the carrier... When I called around everyone asked for the casting number, 28656, which refers to a ribbed carrier.



The following day was supposed to be warm so I dug out all of the paint supplies and figured I would shoot the rear outside. But I wanted to clean the inside one more time before paint. Also, when I originally pulled the carrier, the back lash felt good and the ring gear looked good. So I lifted it up in the air one more time to check the back lash with a dial indicator. As I was rotating the ring gear I was looking up towards the pinion (which is sort of buried in the carrier) and caught a glimpse of something that looked BAD. At that point I decided to pull the pinion cage to get a closer look...



Damn... I still can’t believe that I didn’t feel this in the back lash but these things happen. I also didn’t see any chuck in the bottom of the housing (and I wasn’t really looking either...) since it was raining pretty good and we were trying to get out of the weather. Should I have looked at it better before I cleaned it? Sure, but hey these things happen...

So at that point I started looking for another set of gears. But at least this time I had more information, like the Eaton number on the ring gear, 41962. After a quick Google search of this number, I found a set of gears in Toledo OH (same place that had the carrier years back). They listed the ring gear as 41962 and the pinion as 48820. This is when I posted a wanted ad on the message board hear and well as on a few groups on FB.

More to follow...


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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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After a further Google search I found the ring and pinion number listed on Weller’s Truck website.  They have a great catalog online...

http://www.wellertruck.com/lit/Weller_Diff_Catalog_2011.pdf

But for the ring gear I had, it was listed for an Eaton 19201 rear (and 19501 if its locked in low range...)  The only difference here is that my carrier has 16 spine axles instead of 22.  Weller did not have 5.43’s in their inventory but they were very helpful when I talked to them.



I did get several suggestions on locating gears.  I called a few local places along with Pat at Demo’s but he only had 6.14’s.  Then a guy on FB referred me to Tommy John’s Truck Parts in Wortsburo, NY .  John didn’t have any gears but he referred me to A&A Truck Parts in Freehold, NJ and sure enough he had a set in an International pumpkin.  For some reason International used 10 hole pumpkins instead of the 12 hole, but the gears are the same.  So after a handful of conversations, I made a trip to Freehold which I was able to do during one of my New Brunswick trips for work.  I did get some strange looks when I pulled in the yard with a  rental car and popped the truck open :)



The first thing I noticed was that the companion flange (yoke) was different.  It’s actually a Rockwell yoke for a wing bearing, 72N series.  But after I removed the flange from pinion, I realized that the splined parts of the pinions were different diameters.

Damn (again...)



The inner and outer bearings were the same for both yokes and the shims and spacers were the same, but the original pinion was 10 spline with 1.750” major diameter while the new one was also 10 splines but with a 1.964” major diameter.  So this added another level to my companion flange dilemma...

Before I realized there was a difference in the pinions, I figured I would re-use the companion flange from the 6.71 pinion.  My original driveshaft used Spicer 1500 series U joints.  These have been obsolete for some time but I was able to locate an NOS pair on eBay a number of years ago.  On a side note, Neapco has started making these joints again.  The Spicer number was 5-115X and the new Neapco number is 3-0055.

Then I considered using the Rockewell 72N flange.  One of my International buddies (Kevin L) had a driveshaft I could use but that would mean I would have to have the driveshaft cut and have new yoke welded on, and then buy a new wing u joint.  But before I went down that path, I figured I would try to locate a companion flange to match my Spicer 1500 joint.  Besides, both u joints were new (well from 2008...)  and the flange the u joint goes into was also new.

After searching online with no luck, I remember Jack Alt have given me a vintage Spicer book years ago.  So I dug that out and was able to find a number that matched was I needed, Spicer #4-1-3841. 





Although the flange was listed for a 1480 or 1550 joint, the dimensions matched my 1500 series flange, with a ground flange diameter of 2 5/8” and a length through the hole at 2 1/4".  Of course this flange has been obsolete for some time, I after a quick Google search  I found that Weller had one in stock in Grand Rapids Michigan.  I called the next day and it was the last one they had, still covered in cosmoline and wrapped in wax paper.  It cost a few bucks but was still cheaper than having the drive shaft cut...



And now I had a nice assortment of companion flanges...  On a side note, the round flange was from the 257 rear.  This took (8) 3/8” bolts and a Spicer 1610 series joint, Spicer number 5-279X. 



More to follow...


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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Just a quick follow up on the difference in the pinions...

When I removed the driveshaft from the 6.71 rear in the truck, I was able to read the pinion number which was 41967. This was one digit higher than the ring gear, 41966. So I can assume that the pinion for the 5.43’s was 41961. But the head of the pinion on original 5.43 was really pitted. You could make out ‘Eaton’ and 7 and 38 (38/7=5.43) but that was about it. So when I googled the ring gear number and found Weller’s site, I just assumed the pinion was 48820. Regardless, it all worked out at the end of the day...

Just for comparison, the new pinion vs. the old...





In the mean time I decided to make a ‘jig’ to help remove the pumpkin from the truck using my 4 wheeler jack. I’ve used this jack a 1000 times for different things (like installed the fuel tanks, etc.) but never on a 4 wheeler. So using some flat stock and angle on hand I made something to support the base and the pinion so that I could roll the pumpkin out...







After that was done we drained the oil and then made a few dowels out of some old bolts...



And then we removed the pumpkin...



The jack actually worked pretty well...



To help work on the rear I cut a few other pieces of angle...



And then set the pumpkin on the bench...



More to follow....


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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Once the pumpkin was on the bench I noticed a few things. First of all the ring gear had some rust pits and second there was no back lash (at all!) So we started taking everything apart...



And as luck would have it turns out the carrier bearings were in rough shape...



So I decided to cut the cage off to find this...



Yep, these bearings were in sad shape, but they did make it to Cortland 8 times!



So we started taking everything further apart...



And after a lot of cleaning we had everything laid out and ready to go back together...



In the meantime I tried to find new carrier bearings locally but could not find Timkens, so I had to order them online and they were dropped shipped direct from Timken. While waiting for the bearings we started reassembling the differential...



I also took the old carrier bearings and using a stone wheel on my Dremel, I ground the inside diameter so that I could use the old bearings to press the new ones on. The two carrier bearings are different so I did each side and then pressed the new ones on...





Then we installed the new ring gear and reinstalled the spiders...



And then the carrier was finally done...



More to follow...

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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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One thing I forgot to mention was that a year or so ago, Steve S. gave me a nice Brockway manual, the typical 3 hole punch style that had a ton of technical information in it. After thumbing through it I found a complete set of instructions on how to rebuild the Eaton 2 speed rears. This manual was very helpful and included all of the torque settings, etc... And is also list the elusive model numbers 20501 and 20503!!!



Once the carrier was done we started working on the pinion. Both the upper and lower bearings and races appeared to be in excellent shape so I decided to reuse them. To get the correct pinion preload of between 15 and 35 inch lbs, the pinion nut had to be torqued to 500 ft lbs. I bought a Mac torque wrench for torqueing the bolt on the damper of the 671 and it went up to 600 ft lbs so I was in good shape there. So I would up cutting a 2 3/4" hole in a piece of 4” x 1/4" flat stock and drilling holes to mount it to the companion flange. The I could mount the pinion in the vice and torque the nut properly...



Don’t laugh at the orange strap... That was my contingency plan in case for some reason it came out of the vice. Hey, stuff happens right?



So at this point I had a total of 3 pinions, and ironically they all had the same (2) size shims or spacers in each. Except the International pinion, that had one extra paper thin shim at .005”. So after torqueing the pinion nut, we discovered we could not get enough preload on the bearings. It would basically free wheel with hardly any resistance. After calling the local shops, I found out that no one had any different sized shims. In fact one guy told me to grind one of the shims down, and if I went too far just use a coffee can lid as a spacer. So after scratching my head for a second I decided to buy (2) new bearings. Maybe I should retitle this tread as the “Million Dollar Rear...”

And 3 days later (2) new American made Timken bearings and races arrived. Again using one of the old races I pressed in the new races...



I didn’t have a piece of pipe the correct diameter to press the bottom bearing on, but I did discover the ‘sliding clutch gear’ was the right diameter. So I grabbed the one from the 257 rear and pressed the bearing on...



I installed the 2 original shims and found out I now had too much preload! So I then I added the .005” from the International pinion and wound up with 25 inch lbs. Now we were in good shape!!!

I also discovered that the slots in the castle nut didn’t line up with the hole for the cotter pin so I turned a washer in the lathe to fit. I went back and forth a few times with this but it worked out fine...



After the preload was good, we installed a new felt seal and a lip seal. The felt seal I found on eBay and the lip seal was a local buy.

The felt seal is Federal Mogul 5M 867 and the lip seal is NG 99262.



More to follow...


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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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When we last left off I had just finished installed the felt and lip seal for the pinion. I was able to get some paint matched at our local Napa store and they put it in an aerosol can. This is pretty handy for small stull like this. I used it to paint the new yoke. Ironically the slinger from the Rockwell (International) yoke fit the new yoke I reused that as well...





After the pinion was reassembled and final torqued, we made another jig, this time with some 1 1/2” box tubing and some eye hooks. We used this jig to lift the differential into place...



It would up being too difficult to set the pattern, adjust the backlash, etc. on the bench so we wound up setting it back on the floor...



Using the original set of shims under the pinion cage, the pinion wound up being way too close to the ring gear. So working in small increments, we finally wound up with what I felt was a good pattern...



More to follow...


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oldspwr
Posted 6 Years Ago
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And on a side note, Desitin does not work well for gear marking compound. I read somewhere online that it worked well. Nope... Years ago I set up a handful of rears for my 79 Cutlass, 84 Check truck, etc and had a small amount left. It turns out it was just enough for this gear set.

When we were done torqueing the differential bolts we safety wire everything and set it back on the 4 wheeler jack...



In the mean time I had cleaned the pumpkin housing out really well and fixed a mistake I made years ago. I forgot to installed a bulkhead fitting for the rear axle temp gauge so I wound up installing it in the full plug hole. That really didn’t work well (for obvious reasons..._) so I drilled a hole low in the rear cover and reinstalled the sending unit... That’s my new LED light “Big Larry” lighting up the inside of the housing...



Using the dowels we made earlier, I slide the diff backing into the housing and filled it up with 2 1/2 gallons of Napa’s finest 80W90. We did this on November 29th, the Sunday after Thanksgiving. I was really trying to finish this up and drive the truck before the snow flew. Who would have guessed that the weather would have held off so long. After buttoning everything up we took the truck for a ride and re-calibrated the speedometer... 7300 miles since 2008 isn’t too bad. 1000 miles over the summer of 2015 alone...



Fortunately you can calibrate this speedo with dip switches. I dug out the original instructions which had of the different settings. 5.43/6.71 is .8 so I re-set the switches and then checked the speedometer against a GPS...



So how does the truck work with the taller gears? 4th gear is now like 5th gear was in the past. We didn’t have a change to get it on the highway and run it up to 55-60. But for the most part it seems to work well.

So that finishes things up on the rear axle... So I had the opportunity to take one more pic before putting the truck away for the winter. This one was taken the second week of December...



More to follow...


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