Profile Picture

F7 Hood Repairs

Posted By MP&C 4 Months Ago
You don't have permission to rate!
Author
Message
Aaron
Posted Last Month
View Quick Profile
13th direct

13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)13th direct (3.8K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 6 hours ago
Posts: 3.2K, Visits: 10.3K
Thank you for coming on and showing us how this is done, as I said before I'm a hammer and torch kinda guy seeing this done is interesting.


Driving the greenies nuts
http://www.killcarb.com/
MP&C
Posted Last Month
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Last Month
Posts: 40, Visits: 175
The 51 F7 hood is closer to reuniting with the brace with the newly repaired ends.. Epoxy primer will be under the brace this time around to help prevent the new side patches from rusting again..









Robert 

https://www.instagram.com/mccartney_paint_and_custom/

MP&C
Posted Last Month
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Last Month
Posts: 40, Visits: 175
More progress on the F7 hood, got some SPI epoxy on the hood brace...


Ends are quite a bit better than before..



Vince has the hood just about ready for epoxy...




Robert 

https://www.instagram.com/mccartney_paint_and_custom/

oldspwr
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Fourth Gear

Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 5 days ago
Posts: 417, Visits: 3.8K
Thanks Robert!  Very helpful...  I have also used cut off wheels in the past and always buy the 1/32 and 1/16 3" wheels from my local Napa since they are made in the USA.  You do get some brown dust so I'll have to try the stainless ones you mentioned.

Tom

"Leave no bolt unturned"
MP&C
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Last Month
Posts: 40, Visits: 175
Tom, thanks for the questions and comments!  

For dressing welds I typically start with a 3" cutoff wheel about 1/16 or so in thickness. Less contact patch over about any other abrasive "pad" for less heat buildup.  Less obstructed view for less "thinning" of the parent metal to either side of the weld from hitting that because you can't see.  I'll take the weld down to just above flush, and then finish with a 3" roloc disc about 60 or 80 grit.  


Here's a video I did showing the process on some plug welds.  I would point out that I don't buy swap meet cut off wheels.  Use the ones rated for stainless and you'll notice considerably less "brown cloud" in the air when done, and they last 3-4 times as long.  





Robert 

https://www.instagram.com/mccartney_paint_and_custom/

oldspwr
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Fourth Gear

Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)Fourth Gear (538 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 5 days ago
Posts: 417, Visits: 3.8K
MP&C, this is a great thread, thanks for sharing!!!  What are you using to dress your welds?  I usually use a 2" angle sander/grinder with various grit roloc type sandpaper and then a light 2" scotchbrite pad...

Thanks,
Tom

"Leave no bolt unturned"
MP&C
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Last Month
Posts: 40, Visits: 175
We have a few more spots to fix from cracking and fatigue, namely the holes on the underside for the rubber hood bumpers. We've already repaired three, and from the looks of it, need to take care of the remaining three..











18 Gauge x 1/4" plugs were TIG welded in to fill the existing holes, and a copper backer gives us a bit of a heat sink so the cracks/fatigued areas don't blow a big hole on us..











Welds were dressed on both sides of the sheet metal, and new holes drilled slightly in farther from the edge to help slow down the reappearance of cracks.











Next, I'm sure everyone has seen how these hoods can oil can, show low spots, and try to flop around while driving down the road. Part of that is abuse over the years, fatigue, etc. Any low spots invariably result in a loss of support of the hood and will show oil cans or loose areas.





A good tool to check the crown of the hood is a long straight edge in the form of a 36" rule. If you don't have one, most hardware stores sell aluminum flat bar for a few dollars that will make a good profile template. For this style hood, lows are bad, straight is better, and a slight crown in the center crease along the entire length of the "flat" area of the hood is optimal.. This gives the support to help eliminate those oil cans and floppy hoods. 


When we started there was an obvious area about 12" forward of the rear edge, dead center, that appears low, and was easily pushed downward. In order to better define the center crease and provide the support needed, we will use a sand bag (a rather large one) and lightly hammer from the bottom side into said bag with a purpose built "punch". 











In order to keep the back portion of the hood down against the bag for support, we used our latest "metalshaping" tool to hold the front of the hood up, an engine hoist..





A reference mark is used on the inside, measured and centered...





The crease was checked for low spots prior, and the bottom marked. The "punch" is dragged along the centerline and tapped as you go. Flip the hood over, check crown, remark as needed, repeat. We got to a good straight/slight crown and the oil can disappeared. Pushing along the entire center crease was a nice tight support now..








So if you are having issue with your hood, I would suggest first checking your center crease.

Robert 

https://www.instagram.com/mccartney_paint_and_custom/

MP&C
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)First Gear (42 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Last Month
Posts: 40, Visits: 175
Thanks Jeff!

Our last end for the hood brace. Off with the old.....





Then it gets trimmed to our scribe line and the end media blasted in prep for welding. Our new end is test fit and trimmed until we get the right distance to our reference marks. The "batwings" give us a heat sink at the edge for less chance of burning back the edge at the weld.





The center rib is aligned both on the sides and the face, and tacked in position using the TIG.





The pieces are aligned as we work outward, tacking as we go. A "corking tool" is used as a dolly where any bumping may be needed for alignment.








Tacked...





Welded....





Welds cleaned up and end angles compared..










Now we can get back to straightening sheet metal..


Robert 

https://www.instagram.com/mccartney_paint_and_custom/

Jeff Lakaszcyck
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Rocket Scientist

Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Last Active: 8 hours ago
Posts: 9.0K, Visits: 142.6K
Eddy Lucast (4/7/2020)
John welcome back don't be a stranger, all this time I was thinking a different John, John Gott the trouble maker who keeps distracting Jeff from his lonely White project.


Don't worry too much Eddy, the White has been getting some KBS love lately. 



Jeff
Jeff Lakaszcyck
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Rocket Scientist

Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)Rocket Scientist (12.7K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Last Active: 8 hours ago
Posts: 9.0K, Visits: 142.6K
jovann (4/7/2020)
Jeff..It's mine. Had a little regulator fire last year and burnt a spot in the hood which led to this repair. Robert lives down the street and has been a great asset especially on the Biederman project.
John



John, I figured it was yours, there can't be too many green '51 Ford F7's with rollback bodies around. Robert does beautiful work. 



Jeff


Similar Topics