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Bill Graham ex Porcupine Gold Mines diesel Linn

Posted By Linntractornut 6 Years Ago
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Linntractornut
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Third Gear

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Last Active: 5 Years Ago
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They did a nice job but put older style cab sides on it, and when run in the snow they are subject to less wear and make less noise, can't tell if they are keeping it lubricated in use or not. Graham also owns several ex CANOL pipeline 1942 diesel Linns.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=SxIfJH-TVx4

Grew up down the street from the Linn tractor plant, where many relatives and neighbors once worked, and next door to a Linn/Frink Sno-plow/Walter truck agency. I do free look ups of serial numbers, photographic recognition and advise on any Linn related questions you might have, and generally like to locate/excavate/photograph/identify old iron for fun.
Linntractornut
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Third Gear

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McIntyre Porcupine Mines is the name of the original owner, a major stock listed on the NYSE at the time. It was more recently owned by a man named Ray Bethelette. # 2239 model D-35 (Cummins diesel).

Grew up down the street from the Linn tractor plant, where many relatives and neighbors once worked, and next door to a Linn/Frink Sno-plow/Walter truck agency. I do free look ups of serial numbers, photographic recognition and advise on any Linn related questions you might have, and generally like to locate/excavate/photograph/identify old iron for fun.
Daryl Gushee
Posted 6 Years Ago
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5th Direct

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Nice to see them old Linns out and running. I would not have put glass in the lower door or put in the aluminum dash but everyone has there own thing. I also would have painted all the wood green. I think I'm more of purist when it comes to Linn restoration.

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Linntractornut
Posted 6 Years Ago
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Third Gear

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Last Active: 5 Years Ago
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If I was going to tweak a wood cab design, it would be to make sure the driver has room to get around the steering wheel, because some of the modern rebuilds you can't barely get around the steering wheel, and I know originally they always could especially if you wanted to steer backing up and sometimes a person would wrap their thumbs around the steering wheel and find themselves out on the runningboards if they weren't paying attention about the front wheels going into ruts or holes (pnuematic tires made a BIG difference when first optional in 1930). One guy told me he went to work at the plant as a kid as night watchman and spray painted tractors between his rounds, and that he needed an axe handle to steer them because he was just a skinny kid. And if you're wondering, they did mix their own paint, with a little blue/kind of a spruce/hunter green, how much thinner literally was determined by how soon it had to be dry for delivery! Any lettering was custom done by a professional not an employee.

BUT most Linn employees I interviewed agreed they all preferred the wood cabs (built by a swedish carpenter, George Fisher, who literally was the only employee the length of tractor production by the original concern (1917-1948) even though steel cabs were mostly used after 1940. Salesmen and customers complained the wood cabs made them look "old fashion" and they wanted all the bells and whistles, but mechanics hated working under the dash of a metal cab, and drivers hated roasting in the metal cab (one reason doors were often removed).

Grew up down the street from the Linn tractor plant, where many relatives and neighbors once worked, and next door to a Linn/Frink Sno-plow/Walter truck agency. I do free look ups of serial numbers, photographic recognition and advise on any Linn related questions you might have, and generally like to locate/excavate/photograph/identify old iron for fun.


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