Profile Picture

1959 Autocar

Posted By PickerRun 7 Years Ago
You don't have permission to rate!
Author
Message
ScottM
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
Third Gear

Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)Third Gear (372 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 2 days ago
Posts: 292, Visits: 1.6K
If you happen to need to know anything about the transmission I do have the service manual for it, I can look up what you need, I have a couple different versions, but I don't know what years they were published.

From the book: Service Manual Fuller Models RT-9513 Series

R = Roadranger Transmission
T = Twin countershaft type
O = Indicates overdrive
OO = Indicates double overdrive
F = Included in letter designation, such as RTOF-9513, denotes forward position of the gear shift lever control: shorter distance between face of clutch housing and centerline of gear shift lever housing; gear shift lever knob approximately 4 1/2" forward of gear shift lever housing centerline when in neutral.

From the next page in the book, they specify the torque capacity as 950 lb.-ft; according to the RT-913 book that I have, the first numeral multiplied by 100 gives the torque capacity, in the case of the RT-913 that is 900 lb.-ft.  I think we could safely assume that the 95 in the RTOOF-9513 should be read as one number and multiplied in this case by 10 to give a torque capacity of 950 lb.-ft.


PickerRun (7/20/2015)

QUIZ anyone?  Remember there are no wrong answers. Feed back wanted. Scrap heap is not out of the question.
http://forums.justoldtrucks.com/uploads/images/9ecdc058-3dce-4a30-b378-5be8.jpg





======================
Scott McKenzie
- 1950 Bullmoose B624 forklift
- 1964 Pacific SRDD-D
- 1973 Pacific P9
- 1980 Chevy C60
- 1983 GMC 2500
www.pacifictruckclub.org

wayne graham
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
13th Over

13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 4.8K, Visits: 9.7K
It definitely indicates a double over with turned around top 2 which at that time was the only way double was offered. I would highly recommend putting an isolater in the gear shift as they did sing real good. The 95 will handle a 335 easy and if you don"t pre-select the synchro's will last quite well.  I certainly would not scrap it. We used that transmission for a lot of miles and it is the series that put road ranger on the map. 9513 and 9510 ruled for a few years till we got higher torque motors like the 1693 cat and the big cam cummins.

I cried because I had no shoes till I met a man who had no class.
PickerRun
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 2 Years Ago
Posts: 29, Visits: 44
Do you think this transmission will stand up to a small / big cam 350, that came from a 90s Volvo? I will get looking for some numbers off it this weekend.
wayne graham
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
13th Over

13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 4.8K, Visits: 9.7K
It will be fine for a hobbu truck or if you drive it yourself. I know guys that ran that set up forever. Nothin wrong with a 125 but I would not run out and buy one unless you just want to spend money. lol

I cried because I had no shoes till I met a man who had no class.
PickerRun
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 2 Years Ago
Posts: 29, Visits: 44
Here is a question up for grabs.
I think I'm going to get new steel rails from PG Adams, anyone have some thoughts on thickness. I plan on bouncing down the road with 80K.
Options are:
-1/4"
-5/16"
-3/8" I'm pretty sure 1/2" is overkill even by my standards.
Also what style of cross members
Options are:
-C Channel
-3 Piece
-Trunnion
I would think that the thickness of the frame should match the thickness of the cross members, but maybe there is a reason to have say a 5/16' frame rail and a cross members that are 1/4"
PickerRun
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 2 Years Ago
Posts: 29, Visits: 44
So its on to the transplant. I now have a shiny pair of 25' frame rails in the dimensions of a Freighliner FLD (which is what the donor suspension came from), 3 cross members, and a mag drill. If that isn't a recipe for success or heart break I don't know what is. At least it is starting the other direction, the expensive direction.
This is pretty over whelming to a guy that doesn't do this for a living or even for a hobby. Sounds like I should start with the cross members in a perfectly square frame, then attach the rear suspension, then move to the rear motor mounts and work forward to fabrication of front motor mount, after that slip the cab on loose and start lining everything up before final attachment of the cab mounts, then removing the cab for some body work. See any flaws in this approach??
I should have time for opener of bow season!
wayne graham
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
13th Over

13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 4.8K, Visits: 9.7K
Sounds like you got a plan of action and we all like it when a plan comes together. I did this very job on one of my A model KW's. What I did was cut the flange off the old rails with a plasma cutter. You can do this with a torch too. Then lay the remaining web inside your new rail and you have a template for your drill.  I highly recommend the annular cutters for your drill. You will get about 50 holes on a sharpening in hard steel if you use good cutting compound.  Any good tool sharpening shop can sharpen them. If you use the old web for a template your hoes should be right to get the cross members in square. The frame is like a ladder and once the members are in square the rest is just drilling and mounting. Like you said, put the axles under it first and then build the truck. It is really quite interesting once you get into it. Good luck and keep us posted. Will be here on the off chance I can offer something helpful. Wayne

I cried because I had no shoes till I met a man who had no class.
Aaron
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
13th direct

13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)13th direct (4.3K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 5 hours ago
Posts: 3.6K, Visits: 11.5K
Did you get  a mag drill or a rotor broach, the mag broach is  a lot nicer to use,you don't need pilot holes.
I was shown that to drill frames the easy way with no measuring is to take one of the old rails lay it upside down on  a new rail get to all squared up and then using transfer punches mark the holes you need,cab brackets,motor mounts,fuel tanks,steps,whatever,  across to the new rail,then take the new rail flip it upside down on the other new rail and transfer the needed holes  across to that rail, if you have the cut off pieces of the Freightliner rails use one of those pieces in the first set up.
 You don't need to take the whole truck apart if you don't want to just take one rail out of it,lets say you pull the right rail out of it,lay it back to back on the new left rail along with the right side of Freight liner rail in the position you want for the wheel base,once the holes are drilled in the new left rail set it back to back on the new right rail and transfre those across and drill them.
 I've done this and there is very few holes that you'll need to measure and put in if you don't change things around too much.


Driving the greenies nuts
http://www.killcarb.com/
wayne graham
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
13th Over

13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)13th Over (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 4.8K, Visits: 9.7K
Aaron, That definitely works and I guess it is a matter of choice. I do it as I described cause it eliminates flipping it over and I just find it easier to keep my head on straight that way. I think rotary broach and annular cutter are the same thing. nick name for them is slug cutter named after the Yancy drill. You are correct about doing one rail at a time. definitely allows ont to keep the truck somewhat together.

I cried because I had no shoes till I met a man who had no class.
PickerRun
Posted 7 Years Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)First Gear (32 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 2 Years Ago
Posts: 29, Visits: 44
http://forums.justoldtrucks.com/uploads/images/41210266-bf76-4565-8c7e-9ef7.bmpThis is the animal I have, and HSS annular cutters, the carbide were going to take 1 month to get.
Thank you for the advice on how to approach this. I may have a problem slipping one rail out at a time because they are so different in size. The aluminum rails are 2 1/2" taller in the web and 1" wider in the flange and thicker by almost 1/2" at points of double frame than the steel.


Similar Topics