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1948 Marmon Herrington Model 8MB bus..

Posted By Larry Hyde 3 Years Ago
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Larry Hyde
Posted 3 Years Ago
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I thought I would tell you about my Marmon Herrington bus. I restored it a few years ago and when I found it it was a stripped out beat up hulk. I had been following it for years and actually rode this same bus to school when I was small.I lived in Flushing Michigan and rode it and one of it's Valley Coach Lines sisters to Flint every day. I found a correct interior and things like the correct street scroll for the destination sign in the front and an authentic cash fare box. I rebuilt the flat head  Ford 254 c.u.in. 6 cylinder engine which mounts cross ways in the rear and is mated to a three speed Brown-Lipp gearbox that has an angle drive mounted on it so it can have the drive shaft mounted from it to the back side of the rear axle housing. I later drove for the company for nearly 50 years. It still runs good.
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Jeff Lakaszcyck
Posted 3 Years Ago
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Larry, welcome to JOT ! That is a beautiful bus. I would expect M-H buses are extremely rare, especially the smaller Ford powered ones. Do you know of any others ?

Jeff
chocko
Posted 3 Years Ago
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Very nice Bus.It is hard to believe a small Ford flathead 6 cylinder would move that bus.Thanks Joe D.
Stretch
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Nice !
Larry Hyde
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Hi Jeff. Thanks for the welcome and I all ready am enjoying the site . Yes the gas powered Marmon Herringtons are quite rare. They were actually designed by Ford as a replacement to the earlier (Square FORD models which were the same wheel base and frame like one of my other buses the model 79B ) which I am restoring now for the third time. The earlier little Fords were made by the thousands and Detroit for example had over 3100 of the different models of them over the years that they used them but in 1948,Ford began to struggle with competition from G.M. and the rush by transit systems to buy the G.M.2-cycle diesels. Ford came out with the 8MBs in 1947 and only built them for a couple of years and sold the transit bus division to Marmon Herrington who kept building this model but put their name on them and built them until 1955 .I only know of one other seated one for sure and it is in nice shape but not yet restored at The Old Pueblo Trolley Museum in Phoenix Arizona. Theirs is the one window longer version and has the rear air door also. I know there are probably a few camper conversions running around and may be a couple more seated versions but I do not know of them. Marmon Herrington however was the largest manufacturer of the big electric rubber tired trolley versions and built them by the thousands. There are a few of them in museums.
Larry Hyde
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Thanks much.
Larry Hyde
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Hi Guys. Bear with me I just learning the system.  I think I put Jeff's reply in the wrong column. I hate getting old but I'll get it. I promise. They are pretty rare. there wern't many built and the only other one that is complete and seated and in pretty nice condition but awaiting restoration is at the Old Pueblo Trolley Museum in Phoenix Arizona.  
Larry Hyde
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Thanks Chocko.. Yes it is hard to believe that the little Flathead six would move that bus ,especially with a load of passengers on. They seated 29 and stood 17 and even empty,you don't set any land speed records. Up until this Model 8 MB, Ford used nearly exclusively the flat head V-8 but they claimed that the six had more torque and they experienced less engine failures but I don't know how true that was. This model was all aluminum though where as the earlier "square Fords" like my model 79B had the same steel frame and had steel roofs and window posts.These little Marmons steered like a dream and stopped much better than the earlier ones.
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Larry------Welcome aboard.............and thanks for the picture of a neat old classic.   Some of us forget the neat old engines from the '50s, but when speed limits were lower, wind resistance wouldn't be a factor. I would guess, if it was geared fast enough, that wind resistance would put the engine on it's knees at about 55 MPH, plus or minus.
When I was selling Detroit Diesel in the '70s , a local owner asked me to give him a quote to convert his bus to a 4-53.  In his case, I think his engine was the flathead V-8 . Didn't get the sale !   Some 7-8 years ago I was with a group of 4 that were scanning junk yards in West Virginia and western Maryland, and I have pictures of a bus with the 4-53, mounted in the left rear corner..
Larry Hyde
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Thanks much for the welcome. I drove for this company  from 1964 right up until they sold out and then for their successor right up until last year.  I was one of the youngest drivers they ever hired and over the years drove some great old buses. The little Marmons and Ford Transits were just out of service when I hired in and I could have bought one for a few hundred dollars and being just a young kid ,I had no money so I knew where the one I have ended up and some 20 years later bought it and it was pretty rough by then and spent 2 years bring it back to where it is now. I'll add a picture of what it looked like when I found it. Anyway I learned on a G.M. P.D. 4104 like I have in my collection but drove some really old G.M.3704s with the 4 cylinder Detroit mounted length ways in the back and then drove some G.M.4103s that had the 671 Detroit mounted transversly but still had leaf springs and then came along the 4104s like mine that were the first air ride G.M. Highway buses and became the most popular G.M. bus made number wise. Later models had the 8V-71s and were lighter than the other competitive bus manufactures models and when the companies didn't tie the governors down, were real hot rods when we ran deadhead. Even the old 471s would scoot once you got them rolling if you opened the governors up. Valley Coach's owner liked to tie them down and the two cycle Detroits performed poorly like that and would smoke and struggle on the hills.  I still love the sounds of the old Detroits and enjoy driving the one I restored.  Thanks for the interest..Larry
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