Ford CL-9000 Windshield Wiper Motors


http://forums.justoldtrucks.com/Topic162903.aspx
Print Topic | Close Window

By FireStar01 - Last Year
So I have a 1979 Ford CL-9000, and both of the air operated wiper motors are bad. Just the motors themselves. Is there a place that makes new/refurbished ones? Or is there a relatively easy way to replace them with electric ones? I would prefer to get new air operated motors so that I don't have to run any new wiring, since I already have to rewire the clearance lights...

A little off topic, but are there places that can fix/replace molded plastic trim?
By Brocky - Last Year
Contact Michelle Cole, she is the Ford Guru here. Either a PM / email thru here or PM me and I can send you her email address.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Rome truck parts 

Rome Truck Parts     


www.rometruckparts.com

They are the go to place for air wiper motors.
If they are Sprague and not Trico, I have found that less the $10 worth of hardware store O rings will bring them back to life unless the case is worn out.  
By FireStar01 - Last Year
So after a bit of research on the Rome Truck Parts website, I have determined the air motor used on my CL-900 is a Trico APMS-APMH type motor. Which, on the bright side, means what i thought was a crack in what I thought was the motor case has absolutely nothing to do with the air motor itself. It's just the part that runs the pantograph(?) wiper arms. Something I've literally never seen on any other truck, but I like the concept more than the regular ones to be completely honest. On the down side, unless Rome sells rebuild kits for them I may have to buy some *shiny new ones.*

Thanks for the tip Geoff, and even though I *shouldn't* need help with the wipers anymore, I may need to talk to Michelle about other parts related things. Like those plastic trim bits.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Early IHC 9670 used the Trico motor and had pentagraph arms as well, when Trico stopped making the motor they went with Sprague. I like the Trico better. Very early in production they stopped using the pentagraph arms and went to the single piece arm, I'm not sure why.   
 Have you contacted Rome about re building yours?  I have 2 Trico's and a whole bunch of Sprague's.  
If my memory is correct Ford used pentagraph arms though out the CL production.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
I have not, was gonna do it tomorrow while I was sitting still waiting to load since today was Sunday.

And I would assume as yes on pantographs throughout the run of the CL, judging by the brochure of a late model I looked up. Surprised they didn't catch on in truck, with how much of your windshield they cleared. Must've done better in other industries guessing by Rome's website. Both the 9670s my boss owns ('81 and '87) have standard arms.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
I bet if you look close at the '81 you'll see a "peg" beside the main motor shaft for the 2nd arm of the pantograph It is just above the main shaft., It isn't there on my '89. Both '83 and '84 had the Trico motors, but my '84 had been replaced with Sprague by the time I had it, the '89 came with Sprague.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
T You mean this? It has what looks like a pantograph wiper arm on the passenger side, but the second arm has been removed from the shaft and tied to the main arm with fencing wire.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Yep, that is what I was talking about.  Your pic is the 1st I've seen with the pantograph arm, I guess  most have been replaced by this point.
 I wonder why? 
By FireStar01 - Last Year
Lack/cost of parts and maintenance maybe? Or just preferring the old/current style of arms. Hard to tell honestly, when you're a rookie and the truck you bought less than a year ago is the first you've heard of it.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Pantograph arms are real common on motorcoach's Large RV and marine market. The current 9670 wiper arm part number is for a single arm type.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
Who knows then. Could have something to do with Trico stopping production of the motor, like you said. Then again, I don't know much about the wiper system on the 9670s besides the air runs them and they hiss at me like an angry cat.

On another note, I need to get my motors and arm systems packaged and mailed to Rome so they can take a look at them. Hopefully they can.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Originally, there is a tube on the exhaust that exits the cab on the right side above the radiator, with those tubes in place (one for the right, one for the left) you don't hear the air with the wipers on. The tubes are just long enough and often if the motor has been removed the tube doesn't get put back on. It is enough to drive you crazy on a rainy day, but an easy fix.
 The late production Sprague motor uses a thermoplastic motor housing, early use die-cast aluminum. Both can wear over time, but often just some O rings bring the motor back from the dead. If the arm whips back a forth real fast when starting, it is likely that most of the air is escaping by the O rings. I uses the pressure trapped in the other side of the motor which exits through a restriction to control the arm's speed.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
Huh, I didn't know that. There's an exhaust on the left side of mine, in front of the pedals begind the grill and I can hear that damn thing even when the wipers are off... It'll take me a bit but I'll get it eventually.

Wonder if there's a youtube tutorial out there relating to this or not?
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
I don't know of anything on the .net, this is just stuff I have learned from owning 9670's since the 90's. Yesterday, I just made a new dipstick tube out of stainless steel as the old one had rotted out. I learned that the "bell mouth" on the outer end of the tube is braised on and can be removed from the old tube and braised onto the new one.  I found the IHC part number for the plain steel tube was still good, but prices were in the $250- $300 range and I made my stainless one for about 1/2 that.
The cabovers are still being made for other markets, and many of the part numbers are still good, many show up on Russian websites as I guess they were really popular over there. 
 They shouldn't pass air with the wipers off, so if they are, there is a problem
 The Trico wiper control is different than the Sprague and when the Trico was replaced by the Sprague you were supposed to change the control as well, The wiper will work without the change but will not "park" automatically when turned off. The Trico control you pulled to turn on and rotate to adjust the speed, the Sprague you rotate to turn on and you rotated counter-clockwise past the detent to park. Nice feature of the Trico is you could leave the speed set where you like it and just pull the knob to turn on or push to turn off.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
I always thought the 9670 ine was odd when I got in it, having been accustomed to how the Trico controls on my CL worked, when they worked.

And a yikes on the cost to buy vs cost to make yourself. Good thing shops exist huh? As for the Russians, watching dash cam footage i see a lot of 90s Inernationals and some Freightliners.
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Yeah, Stainless was overkill, the original made it 30 years, but the cost difference between six feet of plain steel 1/2" tube and stainless wasn't much (the tube itself was around $30) shipping, fittings and such to make the bends are what drove the price up. Those expenses would remain the same regardless of the tube material. 
 I had just assumed the bell-mouth was die-formed out of the tube itself, so I had planned to cut the end off the old tube and splice it on the stainless, I was glad to find I didn't have too.
 A trick I learned in aircraft school to bend tubing without crimping  install flare nuts on the tube, Flare both ends, put a flare plug in one end and fill the tube with DRY fine sand, tap it down several times and keep adding sand until full, and install a flare plug in the other end. Make you bends and then remove the sand and wash out carefully. You can make tight radius bends or bends in hard to bend tube (like stainless). Leave a little extra in your line so you can cut off the flares if not needed on the part you are making.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
Huh, I'll have to keep that in mind for if I ever need to bend tubing. That is a really neat trick. Kimda curious as to how that actually works, does the sand just keep it from deforming by nature of being there? And yeah, it can be the little parts that make it expensive, and that stainless should last longer. Not that it needs to, as you've said.

And aircraft mechanic school, I take it? Amd do you know where it would be appropriate for one to share old truck related drawings here?
By Geoff Weeks - Last Year
Yeah, the sand maintains the volume of the tubing while still being "semi-fluid" to allow for bending. Without the sand the tube would collapse in on itself (reducing the volume). You can make tight radius bends, using that method but it is still possible to damage the tubing if not careful. To make a bend without flattening the tube, the outside must stretch and the inside compress, if you take it too far the outside will split.
 To make the broad radius bends for the dipstick tube (can't be too sharp or the dipstick wouldn't pass through) I used the radius on a conduit bender as a guide.
 You can share your drawing here or on the Peter J's forum. We aren't too "anal" about where stuff gets posted here.
By FireStar01 - Last Year
I figured on the sand. I also figured the part of the forum for mechanical questions probably wasn't the place to post a drawing, unless its a plan for something I want to do with a truck and am looking for advice.