Profile Picture

Coleman Trucks

Posted By jhancock 5 Years Ago
Rated 4.3 stars based on 3 votes.
Author
Message
thundersnow70
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 3 Months Ago
Posts: 57, Visits: 109
So I got my F4 Coleman kit hubs/drums turned and the shoes relined. Brake and Equipment Warehouse in Minneapolis MN did the work. They are true craftsmen. The drums were turned just enough to make them round and the shoes took 1/4x2 inch pads. Bonded and baked to cure. They were first sandblasted and tumbled and then dipped in anti-corrosion stuff. B&E warehouse is an old school shop and I can't say enough good about them. One step closer!
thundersnow70
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 3 Months Ago
Posts: 57, Visits: 109
rubbishman
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
5th Over

5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 926, Visits: 3.3K
I will see about scanning that material.

H.S.Blake
1971 IH VCO(T)-190 Leach 2R Packmaster
Fawnskin, CA 6,750 feet above tidewater
chtrout
Posted 3 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Third Gear

Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 283, Visits: 2.5K
rubbishman (7/31/2018)
One of my IH parts books show a Coleman axle breakdown but with IH part numbers, probably won't be of any help.


Yes, that would actually be extremely useful, since anyone carrying IH "NOS" parts might have parts that are a perfect fit for certain Coleman rebuilds.  



Craig H. Trout
ATHS Life Member

Researching Holmes / Plains / Coleman / American Coleman Trucks
and selected production partners, such as Columbian Steel Tank, Quick Way Truck Shovel, Howe-Coleman, International Harvester, Marmon-Herrington, and SnowBlast

rubbishman
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
5th Over

5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)5th Over (1.1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 926, Visits: 3.3K
One of my IH parts books show a Coleman axle breakdown but with IH part numbers, probably won't be of any help.

H.S.Blake
1971 IH VCO(T)-190 Leach 2R Packmaster
Fawnskin, CA 6,750 feet above tidewater
thundersnow70
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 3 Months Ago
Posts: 57, Visits: 109
These are the part numbers I have found so far.
Stub-   C2995A1
Spindle dust shield-  DC2894
Backing plate-  C4733
Brake shoe anchor pins-  C2897
Steering bracket with ball-  C4659
Backing plate for brake anchors-  C3399
Spindle-  C4647
Wheel bearing cap-  C2875
Upper spindle bearing cap-  C2891
Spacer, between wheel bearings-  52889
Wedge for upper bearing cap-  C2892
Hub-  C3982
Brake shoes-  C4375
Wheel bearings are Timken 73562/73875
Spindle bearings on stub are Timken 43125/43312
That's what I have found so far. The C makes it easy to figure out what are Coleman parts. Which is just about everything from what I can tell.
thundersnow70
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
First Gear

First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)First Gear (64 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: 3 Months Ago
Posts: 57, Visits: 109
If I can add my opinion on the 73562/73875 Timkens. It would be hard to say what was common in 1951 or prior. And from my research, which is probably more than most, these bearings and races were used in HEAVY industry. Ships, aircraft etc. If I recall just one of these bearings will support 10,000 pounds radial or axial, I forget which. But still, 10K! The 60000 series are close, and if I recall some use the same cup, 73875. And I'm pretty sure the 60000 series are not being made anymore as well.  Timken has stopped making 73000 series for now so anyone who has them has adjusted their price to reflect that. Keeping in mind "aircraft or ships", 4K-7K might seem reasonable. Then along comes China. My local supplier thinks this company has bought up supply of someone else from somewhere. If you take into account China's restrictive internet policies, etc. how would they know someone in the Netherlands is trying to sell them for over $4000 US. Plus I doubt they know Timken has stopped making them and probably wont start again. A lot of things dealing with rare old trucks is speculation. What is factual is that Coleman had to use a huge bearing because the hub is huge, no clue why they chose the 73000 series. I will assume Timken stopped production due to lack of demand which in turn drove up the price. I will assume China has them due to them buying overstock or buying stock from someone going out of business. And I will assume China sells them cheaper because it's China. Part of me thinks I should just keep buying them from China just because I have a "system" and relationship with them now. The other side of me knows I'm set with 4 new and 4 old. 

That's my 2 cents, for what its worth.............Mark
Tony Bullard
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
13th direct

13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)13th direct (3.4K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 2.9K, Visits: 12.8K
Bruce if you talking about Marks bearings the Timken 73562- 73875 specs are attached. It's an inch series bearing with a not common ID and OD. Being inch series is uncommon in itself.


Tony
Attachments
Bruce Ohnstad
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
5th Direct

5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)5th Direct (825 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 743, Visits: 3.3K
If we can summarize the Timken bearing supply, the Timken bearings in the axle were not common, not stocked in USA but somehow an overseas warehouse had some?  What would have been special about these bearings and "where used"?  Race diameters, widths, roller thickness, snap ring grooves can make for different part numbers.  I'm not familiar with the short run bearing realities, what kind of production volume might these be?  Could a good bearing store measure up diameters and specs and find a will-fit?

Bruce
chtrout
Posted 4 Months Ago
View Quick Profile
Third Gear

Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)Third Gear (384 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Last Active: Yesterday
Posts: 283, Visits: 2.5K
Brocky (7/28/2018)
Learn something new everyday!!!  Did not know Coleman tried to make a farm tractor. BUT those axle ends look planetary rather than Coleman dish????


Origins of the Coleman D44B Farm Tractor Series

Brocky and Hamish,

Yes, I agree, those appear to be replacement hubs and axles. Coleman company photographs, as well as photographs of D44B farm tractors actually in service during 1960s, all have Coleman "heavy dome" hub protectors, but apparently the axles had been changed out since that time on this particular tractor.

As for how Coleman got in the "farm tractor" business, the D44 started out as a prototype for the US Army Engineers, and when Coleman did not win the contract, they looked for other obvious markets, such as industrial and agricultural. The farm tractor variant was the only model that I know of that actually went into production (very few numbers), and I often wondered if it would not have also made a good log-skidder, although I have no evidence that one was ever proposed.

Coleman had started experimenting with four-wheel-drive, four-wheel-steer farm and muskeg tractors in the late 1940s, some even being equipped with a Wilcock swivel frame. In 1954, Coleman began designing a number of very specialized tractor prototypes for the US Army Corps of Engineers, as a forerunner to the FAMECE (Family of Military Engineering Construction Equipment) program, which was later developed to establish a very standardized set of construction vehicles that would utilize a common prime mover (Universal Engineer Tractor – "UET") that could interchangeably act as a loader, dozer, pull a scraper (earth mover), and also perform similar military construction roles. The equipment was required to be very transportable, to include air-drop capability. After many, many Coleman prototypes were produced and vigorously tested, along with other 5-6 other companies also submitting their proposals, the final contract was ultimately issued to Clark Equipment Company in 1980. Along the way, American Coleman began to explore other markets for their FAMECE "UET" prototypes. In addition to possible industrial applications, they also attempted to enter the agricultural market.

That is to say, the Colby, Kansas 4x4 American Coleman D44B is essentially a Coleman prototype FAMECE "UET" tractor modified for the agricultural market, although later getting replacement axles and hubs. The D44Bs originally came without cabs, but every surviving unit that I am aware of has had a unique cab added by their early owners, most often from old farm equipment, such as combines.

On a side note, even though Coleman did try to enter the agricultural marked, in all my many years of research, I have never found a catalog page, spec sheet, or magazine advertisement for a Coleman farm tractor, and I would be extremely interested if anyone knows of an example.

Regardless, either with or without original Coleman hubs and axles, D44B farm tractors are an incredibly rare find.


Craig H. Trout
ATHS Life Member

Researching Holmes / Plains / Coleman / American Coleman Trucks
and selected production partners, such as Columbian Steel Tank, Quick Way Truck Shovel, Howe-Coleman, International Harvester, Marmon-Herrington, and SnowBlast



Similar Topics